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institute for a discussion on the scheduled tax increases the percent to hit in january, including the end of the bush era taxes, payroll tax holiday hikes and invested in come also. a new tax policies and to report says nothing is done. average marginal tax rates would go up by five percentage points on labor income, seven points on capital gains and more than 20 points on dividends. along with more than a trillion dollars in budget cuts. also starting january or known as the fiscal cliff. it should get under way in just a moment. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, and welcome to the urban institute's first tuesday. my name is howard gleckman of the tax center blocks and we are here to discuss taxes in the fiscal cliff. as you all know, washington lives everything that happens here is the biggest or the worst were the most important. how many times for instance have you been told some politician is about to give the speech of his life until he gives the next speech. the tax armageddon has the potential to actually be a watershed in the fiscal policy. true it could be another opp
-span2. after that at noon eastern the urban institute on host a discussion on tax increases that are set to take place in january. the end of the bush income tax cuts the payroll tax holiday and hikes on investment income. speakers include douglas holtz-eakin. that will be live here on c-span2 starting again at 12 in eastern. >> a look now at campaign spending and political ads in the presidential election. from the annenberg public policy center at the university of pennsylvania, this is about 45 minutes. >> i am the editorial communications director at the center for responsive politics, and we are here to talk about the challenges posted journals by dark money and their mysterious donors. erika fowler is joining me on the panel. she is from the west the medium project achieves an assistant professor of government at western university. director of the media project which tracks and analyzes all political ads aired on broadcast television in real-time during elections. she specialized in political communication and she'll be talking about some of the ads we are seeing outside groups an
the lower courts and the individual mandate was a permissible use of the taxing power of congress and not the congress clause and thus the law could be passed. and i think there were three -- one is, you have to take it at its face value. the legitimate use of the taxing power. thirdly and most important in the second and third, the second is that john roberts saw health care, as many people saw health care, as the third in a trilogy of cases starting with bush beat gore in 2000, citizens united in 2010, obamacare in 2012 and that, and in those first two cases, you had five republican justices dashing the dream's of democrats in what would seem to many as a very partisan case. as they sat down to vote on health care, it looked like the same thing was going to happen, the five republican nominees were going to trash the democratic dream. roberts recoiled at that idea. roberts has a very keen sense of politics in the larger sense and he knew and cared deeply that the supreme court not be regarded as simply another branch of congress, where democrats and republicans fight. he wanted
florida. they don't have state taxes, so i believe revenue, you have to have revenue to sustain things that you have. i am not going to raise revenue. he said i'm not going to raise any revenue. how would you sustain your business? i don't understand why everybody else doesn't see this. you have to have revenue. if he is -- to say i'm not going to raise your taxes he is talking to the people. i don't mind paying my fair share but a lot of people are not paying their fair share. they don't realize exactly what he is saying. he doesn't care. he doesn't care about -- so he has to attack somebody. is going to be the same old thing. when republicans get in the same old thing. >> host: henry how long have you been registered to vote and not voted in a presidential election? >> caller: the last was when i was 21 but now i am really looking at it and i have a child now and it's more my responsibility to look at my child's future and when i listen to the debate, here president obama saying hey about education, i don't understand. i don't understand what everybody else is supposed to do because
component of this. let's keep it up and keep taxes low unpredictable and let's have less government regulations and less intrusion in our lives. [applause] moderator: 30 seconds to respond. christie: you know, we have not been able to get much done. my energy policy is making sure that we just create energy positions, short term, long term, medium-term growth for energy, but i just want to make sure that everybody knows that i will be a consistent champion for wind and renewable fuels in this district and congressman king has not been. [applause] moderator: your response, congressman? steve: i happen to be the american wind energy champion designated by the american wind energy association. [applause] i am supported by the renewable fuel and it -- industry across the board so far as i know. we are the number one renewable energy producing congressional district and all of america, the western third of iowa. when you add the other counties to make this we will easily be the number one renewable energy producing district, and i have been part of that. i am proud of what has been accom
he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led t
things right. now, that, the devil is in the detail there but making sure that you don't raise taxes on energy producers. because when you do that you raise taxes for all consumers. again from a manufacturing standpoint, we have a stake in this discussion because we use one-third of this nation's energy output. so every time energy costs increase, the cost of manufacturing increases and adds to the 20% cost disadvantage i mentioned. the regulatory burdens are enormous for the energy industry, and hitting that in check is going to be vital in the next four years. >> that, would you take immigration reform for? >> i would be happy to take the rest of jay's observations about energy policy because for consumers, many of them, difference between whether they can go shopping and spend either mandatory or discretionary spending is the price of gasoline and other commodities but gasoline is the big one and they're certain segments of the retail industry in which you can draw a straight line and an inverse line between the price of fuel and sales that go on and the jobs that get created. so
the fiscal cliff and the tax armageddon and the dysfunctional congress and all of this kind of thing. are there concrete steps the president can take as the principal foreign policy actor to reverse perceptions or to counter perceptions that the united states is in decline in terms of its global influence. >> the most important one by far is attempting to heal the rift domestically in answer to your first question we should have said what i think is the biggest change more than the five areas that tom talked about that weakens us which is that we have never been i.t. as politically polarized and divided. we have never had a dysfunctional congress or dysfunctional relationship between the two ends of pennsylvania avenue. so, the biggest thing the president can do, and he doesn't have to negotiate with any of the foreign partners to do it is to get a slide down the fiscal cliff that has a lot of lease soft landing at the bottom, and to attempt to go beyond that i think -- i hesitate to say this because it seems unlikely, but in trying to find some common ground on a range of domestic i
've often heard about people paying taxes or taxes are too high they are not appropriate. and we appreciate having fun postal service and the schools and programs like nasa that had kicked back and have given wonderful technologies that propelled us and meet people's lives more comfortable than they would have been had those technologies not entered their lives. >> host: question for you, louis. given what you say is the benefit of the government, right now is the government about the right size and what is its influence on your life? >> caller: i.t. we have to be careful when we throw the word size of the government because they're seems to be a misunderstanding as to what the size of the government is as well as the size of the government. but the reality is the problems dictate the size of the government and we shrink the government by reducing the number of federal employees and we actually then end up contacting people to do those tasks any way and we tend not to count them as the part of the government that they are a part of the government. we are just paying more for that resource n
, sitting next to him, not having dinner, sitting next to al gore is taxing. it is really unpleasant. we asked him what was going on in the white house and he said 1%. i believe it is higher. but if we step back, we often don't know what is going on. that is the dilemma. i want to talk briefly and then answer questions about her new book that i have done, which is just out, called the price of politics. it is about 3.5 years of negotiations between the obama white house and the republicans in congress and the democrats. how they essentially tried to bring the federal government's financial house to some kind of order. the answer is they failed. we have a federal government whose financial house is in total disorder, total disarray. it is a historic problem. to try to put it in english, we have a trillion dollars of iou outstanding in the world. the negotiations, they agreed to raise what they call the debt ceiling, so the government can borrow a couple more trillion dollars. we are going to run it run out of that borrowing authority january or february of next year. they're going to have
the bishops, why they continue to not see that. why i see that as not really much -- >> might taxes pay for an awful lot of things that i opposed. [applause] >> just to be clear, the position is that the institution's money does not go toward the care that they object to, so that is why i see it as an appropriate or a well intentioned and well functioning agreement. the money goes from women's pockets to the insurance that they are part of. while there may be other folks who are a part of the same insurance plans to disagree, that happens a lot of ways. i may disagree with someone else's health care choices. i'm sure there are folks on insurance plans to double even blood transfusions, but part of being part of an insurance plan is that we are all putting your money in and we are trusting that it will be medical treatment that is prescribed by doctors for that person and that we recognize and honor each other's choices about our own health care decisions. >> the institution does not seem to get a choice. thank you. >> thank you. that is all that we really have time for this evening. i'm
and that is a very common tax by challengers. there were some good lines. he talked hope is not a strategy. he's tried to emphasize his critique of obama as fighting from behind, which was sort of an unnamed administration official at the very end of a new yorker magazine piece last year and has become a sort of state of republican critiques of the president's foreign policy. that being said, there are some real differences between obama and romney when it comes to foreign policy. for example, romney has russia as an important geopolitical united states. much of the surprise of his advisers at the time, but rather than locking away, just continue to emphasize emphasize and say vladmir putin look at no quarter. barack obama has synthesized as one of his major foreign policy accomplishments, a quote unquote reset with russia that has enabled us to get more done, but they are sending supplies into afghanistan through the northern route, which has become a more significant issue with problems of pakistan have made it difficult for us to get for an example or have a new missile -- sorry time a new
, you can disdegree with him on taxes or whatever, but this is against him personally and trying to destroy and discredit him personally. the obama hate machine. and it's not just fox news. it's out there because of a couple of people that most americans have never heard of, the famous koch brothers, charles -- now-famous, charles and david coke. david koch. and, again, we've seen corporate-sponsored attacks against presidents before, particularly, and i outline two of them, franklin delano roosevelt. by the way, with him it was the dupont brothers, and there were free of those at the -- three of those at the time. formed the liberty league to deny fdr a second term. and then with bill clinton, of course; was richard melon safe who funded all the investigations that led to paula jones and on and on, and the articles in the american spectator. but nothing compared to the money and the organization that we've seen on the part of charles and david koch who are the heads of koch industries, they are the third and fourth richest men in america, people in america, both men. we know abo
, among republicans, one of the big issues is this read the bill issue. having taxed available, making sure members have the opportunity to see what it was they were voting on and i think in large part because i've be issues surrounding that and the drive to make the material available, the 112 congress really sort of march probably the biggest change in terms of transparency since the mid-90s and speaker gingrich really push the library to make comments and all that information available to the public. as we started plastering the transition last time around and going forward through this congress, i think the speaker, the reader can cantor and the republican congress as a whole has tried to clean on transparency issues and made them a priority. this not manifested in a number of different ways during our rules package, most notably was the rules change, which set for the first time in the history of the republic that paper document and electronic brake weblog. if something was available electronically, it was as good as if it had been printed by the government printing office, stuck
romney keeps millions to avoid u.s. taxes. you've got to say this about mitt romney, he sure knows how to go to the gold for himself. >> so the u.s. olympic committee was not that accurate as you might expect. and so, that ad was a little bit short-lived, but got a lot of coverage and views on the internet. and kudos to the later buyers, to priorities who came up with the idea for that ad, david iker bomb who created these ads. but, it's a lot of fun to do what we'd do for a living. priorities has been a great experience and as money has fallen -- sort of flowed i should say, into the superpacs in general, but also priorities has played an important role in this campaign. not the kind of role though that my colleague has a crossroads. >> so there is a bit of a difference here. john works for american crossroads, which is not the romney super pack. there is a counterpart to priorities u.s.a. which embraced specifically that. american crossroads has spent more money and has been around much longer. maybe you can talk a little bit about the decision to do that. obviously came out much ear
'm sure you are taxing or tweeting. you can tell folks if they go to www.brownv2012.com they can actually watch this conversation live online. i want to first introduced the panel. the national council of la raza. second next to her is estuardo rodriguez on hispanic issue and a partner with a group. next to his faye williams, president of the national council of black women. to her left is lenny mcallister author of get right with lenny mcallister. next to lenny we have brent wilkes way down there. sorry. all right then. we have hector sanchez, executive director labor council for latin american. he has a long business time. next to him we have ron busby for the u.s. chamber of commerce. i know ron is a good thing. next to him is alex with the hispanic media coalition, and where hector should become a we have brent wilkes, national executive director, league of united latin american citizens, and putting us up on the end there, they changed it on me, let me get here. make sure i have this right because we did some switching appeared. i'm just been to make them introduce themselves. go rig
of his tax policy or how he wants to comprehensively address immigration as he is criticizing obama for doing it piecemeal. there's got to be that -- he's not telling us the details as he is criticizing president obama. and again, on president obama's part, the press could be much more sort of aggressive on saying so here is where the house republicans blocked the 1x, y ian izzie, what are two strategies for getting around the republicans if you get a second term so hopefully some of the details will get once we start seeing the president shall be made, but i think there is -- we are not forcing them to say i'm not telling you the answer to this question enough, and there are many important questions the campaigns are not answering. >> in terms of are we giving people information they need to make a choice, i think people have information they need to make a choice. the vast majority of people are partisans of one sort or another. that's why they know probably almost every -- i doubt there are many undecided voters in this room, and they get the information they need to make a choic
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17